New Orleans Piano Works
Cell: 504-494-9937



Prices are $150.00 plus tax
Pitch raises of more than 10c may be a bit more.

Unfortunately, no matter how expertly a piano is tuned, atmospheric variations and the nature of the piano's construction constantly conspire to bring it off pitch.

Piano tuning is the aligning of the musical pitch of the various notes of the piano, by adjusting the tension of the piano's strings, in order to achieve a desired musical effect. .


Depending on age, and how a piano was built, every piano has its own distinct sound or "voice" or its own personality.

Over time, as a piano is played, the hammer felt that strikes the strings wears down and compacts.

As the felt hardens this can cause the tone to become lifeless or dull.  The technician can treat the hammers in various ways: by aligning, shaping, careful
needling or hardening the hammers, in order to get the tone you're looking for. It is most important for a piano has to be finely tuned and regulated before it can be voiced.

Regulation is the adjustment of the mechanical aspects of the pianos to compensate for the effects of wear, the compacting and settling of cloth, felt, and buckskin, as well as dimensional changes in wood and wool parts due to changes in humidity.

 The three systems involved in regulation are the action, the trapwork and the damper system. The action is the mechanical part of the piano that transfers the motion of the fingers on the keys to the hammers that strike the strings. It is comprised of over 9,000 parts which require adjustment to critical tolerances to be able to respond to a pianist's every command. The trapwork is the assemblage of levers, dowels and springs that connects the pedals to the action affecting sustain and dynamics. The damper system is the mechanical part of the piano that stops the vibration of the string when you release the key and is controlled by the key and pedal systems.


A piano is a work of art itself, a fantastic complex machine, with thousands of moving parts.  It has a framework and soundboard supporting tremendous string tension, and beautifully finished cabinetry.

Although remarkably durable, pianos are subject to deterioration with time and use. Felt wears, strings break, wooden structures weaken and crack, and the exterior finish loses its beauty. Regular service and periodic action regulation can compensate for minor wear, but heavy or extended use -- especially when combined with wide seasonal humidity swings -- can eventually cause severe deterioration.

 Today, many high-quality older pianos exist in various stages of wear. Because it happens so gradually, this wear often goes unnoticed, leaving many pianos operating far below their potential. In extreme cases, some older pianos are simply left unplayed because of their poor condition.

Some technicians possess the skills to restore such instruments to excellent condition. This work is variously described as rebuilding, restoration, or reconditioning. To establish some uniformity, the Piano Technicians Guild uses the following terms:

Reconditioning is the process of putting a piano back in good condition by cleaning, repairing, and adjusting for best performance with parts replacement only where necessary. This is most appropriate for a piano with only moderate wear or those of medium value with average performance requirements.

Reconditioning does not involve replacing major components such as the soundboard, bridges, pinblock, and most action parts. This means the performance and life-span of an older piano will not be restored to new. Instead, reconditioning is designed to improve a piano's performance, keeping in mind both costs and benefits.

Rebuilding involves complete disassembly, inspection, and repair as necessary, including replacement of ALL worn, damaged, or deteriorated parts. This piano is then reassembled, tested, and adjusted to the same or similar tolerances as new.

COMPLETE REBUILDING includes the entire pianos structure -- including soundboard, bridges, pinblock, and strings -- as well as the action, keyboard, and case refinishing.

PARTIAL REBUILDING includes only one or two of these areas, for example rebuilding of the action and structure, but not case refinishing.

Rebuilding restores the piano to original condition or better. Such comprehensive work is usually most practical for high-quality instruments where maximum performance and longevity are required.

Contact Me:
David Doremus
New Orleans Piano Works
(504) 263-2923  (504) 494-9937 |